2017 Coppo Chardonnay Costebianche

Country

Size

Vintage

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$15.99

8 in stock

Winemaker Notes

A partially wood-aged Chardonnay that’s round on the palate. White peach, apple, and floral notes, all with a touch of salt.

Costebianche is the youngest Chardonnay produced by Coppo. The wine gets its name from its vineyards, which are planted in naturally white soils of clayey-calcareous marl.

Color:
straw yellow with greenish reflections

Nose:
floral notes, apple, white peach, and citrus fruits

Taste:
fresh and round, pleasantly savory

Pairings:
vegetables aspic, gazpacho, stuffed zucchini flowers, sole meuniere

Name origin:
this wine owes its name to the color of the soil where the vineyards are located, Costebianche means in fact white slopes

About Coppo Winery

Piero Coppo was the head of the family and founder of the core that became today’s modern winery. He was known for his finely-tuned palate and infallible nose. Above all, he was known for his strong sense of ethics with which he managed all his activities. He strived for perfection down to the last detail, personally checking on all phases of work, from the vineyards to pressing, and from the winemaking to bottling and aging in a near-obsessive search for absolute quality without compromise.

At the time, Canelli was an important market for Piedmontese grapes, and a fundamental juncture for vine growers and winemakers. It was in this city in the 1800s that Coppo made the first Italian spumante with secondary bottle fermentation. This method is the same used to make Champagne; thus, the wine was called Moscato Champagne. Coppo’s intuitive move was destined to change Italian wine history and cast the city of Canelli in a role of noteable importance as it proved itself worthy of developing an international wine industry at the forefront of change.

In Canelli in 1913, Piero married Clelia Pennone, the heir to the Pio Pennone winery, a “leading and renown” producer and exporter of wines that had already been active for two generations. Thus the Pennone winery was added to Coppo in the center of Canelli between Via Giuliani and Via Alba, and today comprises the central seat of the winery.

In this very winery at the end of the 18th century, the galleries and corridors known today as the Underground Cathedrals were excavated from the tuff stone under the earth. Because of their historical value and unique, architectural beauty, these underground cellars have been recognized as a Unesco World Heritage site.

Passing through the underground cellars, one may walk underneath the entire length of the hill, finally reaching the point where the spumanti rest on their lees. Here, at the end of the long lines of bottles, pass through an ancient wood and cast iron door to emerge directly on the other side in the garden of the magnificent art nouvea villa that Piero bought the same year he was married.

At the beginning of the 20th century, the winery’s production ranged from sparkling wines to classic Piedmontese reds, among which Barbera stood out. Coppo also produces Vermouth, an aromatized wine (often Moscato di Canelli) that became fashionable in the 19th and 20th centuries. Vermouth is one of the world’s most popular cocktail ingredients, and it definitively contributed to the wealth and fortune of Canelli.

Wine production in the first decades of the 20th century was profuse and frenzied. Wine and sparkling wine sold fast in Italy and around the world, leaving the wineries on carts pulled by oxen and encased in 200-liter, oval Bordeaux barrels. Wine was exported mostly in South America and to the United States, where it was sold in bulk and in demijohns.

In 1948, Canelli was hit with two floods that destroyed the town’s lower section, which was built near the Belbo river bed. Coppo winery was not spared, and suffered extensive damage.

The family decided to move the entirety of their wine production to Via Alba, next to the hill and to the cellars already excavated underground. In these years, Piero Coppo’s son Luigi entered the family business, shouldering the responsibility of facing those difficult and trying times.

Because of his tenacity and determination, the wineries were not only restored, but were modernized, adopting innovative technology. For example, Coppo was one of the first wineries to use a ventilated tunnel to dry large numbers of labels at one time.

Because of Luigi’s passion for great French wines, between the ‘60s and ‘70s the winery began to import the wines of Burgundy and Champagne. Luigi represents the fourth generation of the Coppofamily. He implements new communication strategies, using the internet and social networking, and a new standard of guided winery visits. Luigi becomes hospitality manager and leads a team that hosts visitors and customers into the Underground Cathedrals, a privilege that allows them to convey the company vision to a broader public.

2017 Coppo Chardonnay Costebianche

$15.99

8 in stock

Country

Size

Vintage

Categories: , ,

Winemaker Notes

A partially wood-aged Chardonnay that’s round on the palate. White peach, apple, and floral notes, all with a touch of salt.

Costebianche is the youngest Chardonnay produced by Coppo. The wine gets its name from its vineyards, which are planted in naturally white soils of clayey-calcareous marl.

Color:
straw yellow with greenish reflections

Nose:
floral notes, apple, white peach, and citrus fruits

Taste:
fresh and round, pleasantly savory

Pairings:
vegetables aspic, gazpacho, stuffed zucchini flowers, sole meuniere

Name origin:
this wine owes its name to the color of the soil where the vineyards are located, Costebianche means in fact white slopes

About Coppo Winery

Piero Coppo was the head of the family and founder of the core that became today’s modern winery. He was known for his finely-tuned palate and infallible nose. Above all, he was known for his strong sense of ethics with which he managed all his activities. He strived for perfection down to the last detail, personally checking on all phases of work, from the vineyards to pressing, and from the winemaking to bottling and aging in a near-obsessive search for absolute quality without compromise.

At the time, Canelli was an important market for Piedmontese grapes, and a fundamental juncture for vine growers and winemakers. It was in this city in the 1800s that Coppo made the first Italian spumante with secondary bottle fermentation. This method is the same used to make Champagne; thus, the wine was called Moscato Champagne. Coppo’s intuitive move was destined to change Italian wine history and cast the city of Canelli in a role of noteable importance as it proved itself worthy of developing an international wine industry at the forefront of change.

In Canelli in 1913, Piero married Clelia Pennone, the heir to the Pio Pennone winery, a “leading and renown” producer and exporter of wines that had already been active for two generations. Thus the Pennone winery was added to Coppo in the center of Canelli between Via Giuliani and Via Alba, and today comprises the central seat of the winery.

In this very winery at the end of the 18th century, the galleries and corridors known today as the Underground Cathedrals were excavated from the tuff stone under the earth. Because of their historical value and unique, architectural beauty, these underground cellars have been recognized as a Unesco World Heritage site.

Passing through the underground cellars, one may walk underneath the entire length of the hill, finally reaching the point where the spumanti rest on their lees. Here, at the end of the long lines of bottles, pass through an ancient wood and cast iron door to emerge directly on the other side in the garden of the magnificent art nouvea villa that Piero bought the same year he was married.

At the beginning of the 20th century, the winery’s production ranged from sparkling wines to classic Piedmontese reds, among which Barbera stood out. Coppo also produces Vermouth, an aromatized wine (often Moscato di Canelli) that became fashionable in the 19th and 20th centuries. Vermouth is one of the world’s most popular cocktail ingredients, and it definitively contributed to the wealth and fortune of Canelli.

Wine production in the first decades of the 20th century was profuse and frenzied. Wine and sparkling wine sold fast in Italy and around the world, leaving the wineries on carts pulled by oxen and encased in 200-liter, oval Bordeaux barrels. Wine was exported mostly in South America and to the United States, where it was sold in bulk and in demijohns.

In 1948, Canelli was hit with two floods that destroyed the town’s lower section, which was built near the Belbo river bed. Coppo winery was not spared, and suffered extensive damage.

The family decided to move the entirety of their wine production to Via Alba, next to the hill and to the cellars already excavated underground. In these years, Piero Coppo’s son Luigi entered the family business, shouldering the responsibility of facing those difficult and trying times.

Because of his tenacity and determination, the wineries were not only restored, but were modernized, adopting innovative technology. For example, Coppo was one of the first wineries to use a ventilated tunnel to dry large numbers of labels at one time.

Because of Luigi’s passion for great French wines, between the ‘60s and ‘70s the winery began to import the wines of Burgundy and Champagne. Luigi represents the fourth generation of the Coppofamily. He implements new communication strategies, using the internet and social networking, and a new standard of guided winery visits. Luigi becomes hospitality manager and leads a team that hosts visitors and customers into the Underground Cathedrals, a privilege that allows them to convey the company vision to a broader public.

Winemaker Notes

A partially wood-aged Chardonnay that’s round on the palate. White peach, apple, and floral notes, all with a touch of salt.

Costebianche is the youngest Chardonnay produced by Coppo. The wine gets its name from its vineyards, which are planted in naturally white soils of clayey-calcareous marl.

Color:
straw yellow with greenish reflections

Nose:
floral notes, apple, white peach, and citrus fruits

Taste:
fresh and round, pleasantly savory

Pairings:
vegetables aspic, gazpacho, stuffed zucchini flowers, sole meuniere

Name origin:
this wine owes its name to the color of the soil where the vineyards are located, Costebianche means in fact white slopes

About Coppo Winery

Piero Coppo was the head of the family and founder of the core that became today’s modern winery. He was known for his finely-tuned palate and infallible nose. Above all, he was known for his strong sense of ethics with which he managed all his activities. He strived for perfection down to the last detail, personally checking on all phases of work, from the vineyards to pressing, and from the winemaking to bottling and aging in a near-obsessive search for absolute quality without compromise.

At the time, Canelli was an important market for Piedmontese grapes, and a fundamental juncture for vine growers and winemakers. It was in this city in the 1800s that Coppo made the first Italian spumante with secondary bottle fermentation. This method is the same used to make Champagne; thus, the wine was called Moscato Champagne. Coppo’s intuitive move was destined to change Italian wine history and cast the city of Canelli in a role of noteable importance as it proved itself worthy of developing an international wine industry at the forefront of change.

In Canelli in 1913, Piero married Clelia Pennone, the heir to the Pio Pennone winery, a “leading and renown” producer and exporter of wines that had already been active for two generations. Thus the Pennone winery was added to Coppo in the center of Canelli between Via Giuliani and Via Alba, and today comprises the central seat of the winery.

In this very winery at the end of the 18th century, the galleries and corridors known today as the Underground Cathedrals were excavated from the tuff stone under the earth. Because of their historical value and unique, architectural beauty, these underground cellars have been recognized as a Unesco World Heritage site.

Passing through the underground cellars, one may walk underneath the entire length of the hill, finally reaching the point where the spumanti rest on their lees. Here, at the end of the long lines of bottles, pass through an ancient wood and cast iron door to emerge directly on the other side in the garden of the magnificent art nouvea villa that Piero bought the same year he was married.

At the beginning of the 20th century, the winery’s production ranged from sparkling wines to classic Piedmontese reds, among which Barbera stood out. Coppo also produces Vermouth, an aromatized wine (often Moscato di Canelli) that became fashionable in the 19th and 20th centuries. Vermouth is one of the world’s most popular cocktail ingredients, and it definitively contributed to the wealth and fortune of Canelli.

Wine production in the first decades of the 20th century was profuse and frenzied. Wine and sparkling wine sold fast in Italy and around the world, leaving the wineries on carts pulled by oxen and encased in 200-liter, oval Bordeaux barrels. Wine was exported mostly in South America and to the United States, where it was sold in bulk and in demijohns.

In 1948, Canelli was hit with two floods that destroyed the town’s lower section, which was built near the Belbo river bed. Coppo winery was not spared, and suffered extensive damage.

The family decided to move the entirety of their wine production to Via Alba, next to the hill and to the cellars already excavated underground. In these years, Piero Coppo’s son Luigi entered the family business, shouldering the responsibility of facing those difficult and trying times.

Because of his tenacity and determination, the wineries were not only restored, but were modernized, adopting innovative technology. For example, Coppo was one of the first wineries to use a ventilated tunnel to dry large numbers of labels at one time.

Because of Luigi’s passion for great French wines, between the ‘60s and ‘70s the winery began to import the wines of Burgundy and Champagne. Luigi represents the fourth generation of the Coppofamily. He implements new communication strategies, using the internet and social networking, and a new standard of guided winery visits. Luigi becomes hospitality manager and leads a team that hosts visitors and customers into the Underground Cathedrals, a privilege that allows them to convey the company vision to a broader public.